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Woodworking Videos

Making a Tripod Dolly

tripod dollyAnyone who follows my YouTube Channel will know that from time to time I am out doing vids in other people's shops, art galleries, shows and so on. I always use a tripod when I video tape, either inside or outside. When shooting inside I have often wished I had a tripod dolly with me. I checked them out on-line and found that most of them seem to start around $100 price and go up from there. After carefully looking at them, I think I can make something at least as usable as what I have seen but for a lot less money ... and for the amount I need it, the cost of a 3 wheels and a few nuts and bolts it should be fairly easy to make.

The only real disadvantage of mine is the arms will not be adjustable, which I really don't need or care about anyway.



It will fit all my tripods and that's all I care about. To figure out the size, I dropped a plumb-bob down from the center shaft of my favorite Slik Tripod and adjusted the legs to where I would like to have them for indoor shooting. I discovered that the length was 21 inches from the centre ...

Building an Album Table

Well ... you may choose to call it something else, and you would not be wrong with whatever name you gave this handy little table. I has many uses and many names. I have been unable to find it earliest source or where it originated from which probably means version of this go back so far it is beyond recorded history of furniture making.
I have always wanted to make one of these little tables but always had concerns about the wood movement in the legs. Depending on the moisture content and the type and cut of the wood the legs could have a mind of their own in terms of bending and bowing. I knew the best way to combat this was to laminate the wood in the legs which goes a long way to keeping the legs stable, straight and very strong.

This method is nothing knew, I first discovered it when I had the opportunity to see in person some original Gustav Stickley furniture. One of the things I noticed on some pieces was that the legs were composed of 2 pieces of wood glued together. I was told, this was not because they didn't have the wood in the correct sizes, or could not get it, but that the pieces that were glued together were actually more stable as laminated wood with less tendency to bow and bend when subjected to varying humidity levels.

 

 The information wasn't new to me, but what was new was that for some reason, to have Gustav Stickley using this technique seemed somehow legitimize the methodology. For some reason in my mind, I never really thought about the fact that all these amazing woodworkers of past had the same wood movement problems we all still encounter today ...

One Tree Woodwork Exhibit

Not everyone has the gift of "vision". It is one of those attributes that comes from true artistry and there have been many in the past who had ideas and visions of what they wanted to accomplish and some have become well know names like Frank Lloyd Wright, Charles and Henry Greene, Gustav Stickely, Thomas Molesworth, George Nakashima, Harvey Ellis and many many more.

Today, we have even more exceptional woodworkers with a flare for new and innovative ideas and once in a while we get a chance to see some of their creations and modifications all in one place. Such was the that at the recent One Tree Exhibit hosted by the Robert Bateman Centre in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada and in association with Live Edge Design.  Robert Bateman of course is know world wide for is exceptional paintings, so who better to show of the works of fellow artist woodworkers.

The whole concept of the One Tree Exhibit was based on the concept that all the artists would use the one from the same tree. In this case, a big old Broadleaf Maple that had died some time ago which left portions of it spalted, some figured ... 

Make a Box Joint Shoe Shine Tote

shoe shine boxOn a previous video, I re-made the Lynn Sabin adjustable Box Joint Jig and adapted it to the router table. I had put off doing this as I already had one that worked fine on the table saw, but after many, many requests I decided to make a router table version unit of all our European subscribers who cannot purchase dado blades in most European countries. After building the jig and trying it out, I found I really liked this version. It seems much less dusty to operate that the same jig on the table saw that is using dado blades or even the dedicated Freud - Box Joint Blade Set, and the joints are nice and crisp with cleaner edges that what I was getting on the table saw.

I decided the next step should be to actually make project of some sort so I can really try out this jig and see how it really performs. As it happens, I had been in an Antique Store a few weeks earlier and had seen, what I called a shoe shine tote. A lovely little box, with box joint corners and some sort of a sole deck on top of the lid that could double as a handle.

I didn't have any plans and just went by what I had remembered when I saw the tote in the store. The only thing that really stood out for me was that the box joints appeared to be 1/4", which was perfect for this new router based, box joint jig.

Making a Box Joint Jig for the Router Table

I have received countless emails and messages about adapting the Lynn Sabin Box Joint Jig to the router table, and that is what this article and video are about.
Some time ago, I made a video using the Lynn Sabin plans that are available on sharkguard.com, very kindly provided by Lee Styron ... thanks Lee, for doing this. The Leeway Workshop LLC provides quality safety devices for table saws, like Shark Guard, splitters and riving knives. The link to specific plans is further down this article.

The plans, as I understand it, were originated by Lee Sabin for use on a table saw, using single blades, dedicated box-joint jig blades, such as Freud Tools, or using a stacked dado blade set-up. If you have never made this jig before, it is best to read these and the instructions provided with the plans, before you begin.

This jig works great on the table saw using dado blades, unfortunately, dado blades are not available in most European countries.  I understand it is not illegal to own them but it is illegal to sell them. The plans I used are basically identical to those provided on the sharkguard.com website, with a couple of small alterations.

 

For everyone who is on the metric system, you will have to do all the conversions yourself. I do not know what router bits sizes, or threaded "ready-rod" types you have to work with. All the components I used were Imperial.

The way this jig works is based on the the "ready rod". I used a 16 threads per inch version. This means that if you have a nut on a rod like this, and turn the rod 16 times, it will advance that nut one full inch. Converting that to a 1/4" box joint, from the start position, you make one cut, turn the rod 8 times and that will advance the carriage 1/2" inch which means the second cut will leave a 1/4" pin, then make the cut at the 1/2" mark, and so on ... thus making the beginnings of the box joint cuts.

Demonstration - Panel Raiser on Table Saw

In this video we look at the Panel Raiser on the table saw. With many thanks to George Vondriska from the Woodworkers Guild of America (see link at end of video) for his video on using the Panel Raiser with a wood router on a router table. Because woodworking has so many different way of accomplishing the same thing, we thought it would be good to show another way of using the Panel Raiser.

 

Be sure and and stay tuned for more great woodworking videos ....