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Building a Small Parts Storage Cabinet

I seem to go through phases where I have this need to re-organize my stuff and it's often triggered by an event. Recently I lost the little mounting foot that goes in the head of my small Gorilla Tripod. Oh sure you can buy new ones, and have them shipped to you but most of the ones I saw, with shipping, are about the same price a buying a whole new tripod! Eventually (2 months later) I have found the missing foot and all is well again, but it made me realize I have camera and video gear in at least 3 different places and it's time to get it all in one place ... the workshop where it is being used.

The real problem with all these bits and pieces is that they are currently being stored in little plastic rectangular trays, which work ok, but they take up a lot of shelf space because you can't store something above them like you can with a little cabinet with drawers. And that was my motivation.

I had some other ideas along the way, like having something with a Dutch Door or half door so that if you had something lying in front of the little cabinet, you could still open the door without knocking something on to the floor. I also liked ....

Important Viewer Information

When ever I get a number of similar questions, it tells me that there are a lot of other people out there who have the same question, but just haven't asked it yet, it also tells me that I may not have explained something clearly so it's time for me fix that, so here goes. There are 2 main questions I have had repeatedly for ... well ... a long time and I should have addressed them earlier instead of trying to answer emails and messages one at a time.

Question #1 - How do I know when you are releasing a new video?  ... great question.
The answer is, I try to release a new video every Thursday morning (not I am not always successful at that goal). The BEST way to know when I release a new video is to go to my YouTube Channel and right next to the "Subscribe" button, is a little round GEAR. If you click on that GEAR it will pop up a new little window with a check box  ... if there IS a check mark inside the box, it means you will receive an email every time I release a new video, with a direct link to that video. If there is NO check in the box, it means you will not be notified of any new video releases or any other channel information, so check the little box, then SAVE that change and watch for the next video release notification.

Question #2 - How can I find specific videos you released in the past?
Another good question. Currently I have something like 250 videos online so yes, it can be hard to find one specific video. The best way to do this is to go to woodworkweb.com to do a search for the video. 
For every video I release I also write and article about that video. knowing this, it is now easier to find a video if you can recall a key word or a couple of key words from that video that would have been used in the article.
If you use the "Search" box in the upper right area of the woodworkweb.com website, you will be able to find that video by typing in a key word ... hit the return or enter key and every article in woodworkweb.com will be searched for that word or set or words.
To search for a set of words it is best to use quotes "  " .
Such as "trim router"  or "saw blade". Try NOT to look up words that are used commonly like router, wood, joint etc. as these will give too many responses for you to look through.

With that info you will all be able keep up-to-date with the latest videos, and be able to find older videos in much less time.
Thanks everyone for watching my videos, and to all of you who ask questions and those of you who help me by answering other people's questions ... these are an enormous help to me, so thanks everyone.

Colin

 

Cutting Cabinet Backs and Box Bottoms

Some things in woodworking are just not that exciting and cutting backs and bottoms probably falls quite nicely in that category. So why am I even covering it, because I have had a number of emails and comments from subscribers on the topic and I know if a few people comment on something, there are probably hundreds who also have questions but just don't ask the questions.

So, cutting backs on cabinets or bottoms for boxes is really exactly the same thing. All you are doing is cutting rabbet around insides of the cabinet carcass to allow for the inserting of a back. The back could be plywood, or it could be a series of boards. Either way, the best way of putting these backs on is in such a way that the back of the back - is flush with the back of the carcass or it can even be inset a bit more, but definitely not sticking out from the back of the cabinet of box.

 

Back in the day when I first learned serious woodworking, we always cut the backs using a dado blade on the table saw. That's just the way things were done then. There wood routers, but they were uncommon, had very few bits and were really still in their infancy, so weren't even considered for this function back then ....

Wobble Wheel Dado Sizing Jig

wobble blade jigMany many years ago I purchased a Wobble Wheel Dado Blade. For those of you who do not know this blade, it is an interesting invention where a single blade is mounted in housing that when you turn the housing base, it offsets the wheel in stead of running true. The more you offset the blade the wider the dado it will cut. The blade works fine, although mine seems to be a bit sticky and harder to move in recent years. I have also heard many people who don't like wobble wheel dado blades, explaining that the blades don't give perfectly flat bottom dados because of their design, the bottoms are slightly convex or hollowed.

If you check out the previous video I did on this, you can see that ... yes, there is ... barely a dip in the dado cuts, but honestly, I think in most situations this would be more than acceptable for most people. I also have a stacked dado blade set that I use most often, mostly because it is more accurate for cutting size of dados I need.

Personally, my only real complaint with wobble wheel dado blades is that in order to get a snug fitting dado, you need to fiddle around with them setting, testing, re-setting and re-testing. All this takes time and I have always thought it would be nice to have some sort of a jig that I could use that I could set the blade width before putting it into the table saw, that would be accurate and give me the kinds of dados I want. 

A Tool Tote Teaching Task

tool toteThere are always new people interested in woodworking, and often these are younger people who have an interest in learning how to do woodworking and the best way of teaching them is getting them involved in making something. In the past I have made bird houses, and they are fine, but more recently I discovered another project that is still quite easy, but this one gives the woodworking student something to take away and something they can use in the future ... their very own tool tote.

It's easy to make, can be made with power tools or hand tools, there are many different designs, sizes and methods of making these all of them have their own unique advantages and perfect build for helping to teach newcomers to woodworking some of the finer techniques and methods.

I prefer to use Pine, or some other softwood as it is lighter in weight, so less to carry around. Softwoods are usually less expensive and easier to "work" than hardwoods, and if you make a mistake, it's not too costly to fix or replace. What's nice with this design is it doesn't take all that long to make, the tote works great and you can use a wide variety of tools in making and assembling it.

Building a Thin Strip Tablesaw Jig

Cutting small pieces on any power tool can be dangerous so we always try to think of ways to be safer while still maintaining the quality of cut we need. As we all know, table saws are notorious for kicking back wood and especially smaller pieces that are hard to hold on to make these risks higher and more crucial to address.

The jig outlined in this article addresses the kick back and other risks, but remember, working safely is always paramount. If you do NOT feel comfortable using any power tool for any type of cut, do NOT do it. There are hand tools and other ways of making cuts that may be slower for you, but they allow you the confidence of being in control of your work and your tools.  Remember,  you are always responsible for your own safety and well being and for making the right choices and decisions.
For this jig all that is requite is a T-nut and matching bolt and another nut that will be used as a locking mechanism for the bolt. You will also need a piece of hardwood that is at least 2 inches wide and at least 6 inches long. You will also need something called a "Mag Switch".

 

Mag Switches come in a variety of sizes and types and because of their Patent, they are the only thing on the  market that I know of that can do these kinds of jobs. They are quite widely available and links are provided here to see the different sizes ...