Woodworking Jigs Videos

Building a Thin Strip Tablesaw Jig

Cutting small pieces on any power tool can be dangerous so we always try to think of ways to be safer while still maintaining the quality of cut we need. As we all know, table saws are notorious for kicking back wood and especially smaller pieces that are hard to hold on to make these risks higher and more crucial to address.

The jig outlined in this article addresses the kick back and other risks, but remember, working safely is always paramount. If you do NOT feel comfortable using any power tool for any type of cut, do NOT do it. There are hand tools and other ways of making cuts that may be slower for you, but they allow you the confidence of being in control of your work and your tools.  Remember,  you are always responsible for your own safety and well being and for making the right choices and decisions.
For this jig all that is requite is a T-nut and matching bolt and another nut that will be used as a locking mechanism for the bolt. You will also need a piece of hardwood that is at least 2 inches wide and at least 6 inches long. You will also need something called a "Mag Switch".

 

Mag Switches come in a variety of sizes and types and because of their Patent, they are the only thing on the  market that I know of that can do these kinds of jobs. They are quite widely available and links are provided here to see the different sizes ...

Making a Box Joint Jig for the Router Table

I have received countless emails and messages about adapting the Lynn Sabin Box Joint Jig to the router table, and that is what this article and video are about.
Some time ago, I made a video using the Lynn Sabin plans that are available on sharkguard.com, very kindly provided by Lee Styron ... thanks Lee, for doing this. The Leeway Workshop LLC provides quality safety devices for table saws, like Shark Guard, splitters and riving knives. The link to specific plans is further down this article.

The plans, as I understand it, were originated by Lee Sabin for use on a table saw, using single blades, dedicated box-joint jig blades, such as Freud Tools, or using a stacked dado blade set-up. If you have never made this jig before, it is best to read these and the instructions provided with the plans, before you begin.

This jig works great on the table saw using dado blades, unfortunately, dado blades are not available in most European countries.  I understand it is not illegal to own them but it is illegal to sell them. The plans I used are basically identical to those provided on the sharkguard.com website, with a couple of small alterations.

 

For everyone who is on the metric system, you will have to do all the conversions yourself. I do not know what router bits sizes, or threaded "ready-rod" types you have to work with. All the components I used were Imperial.

The way this jig works is based on the the "ready rod". I used a 16 threads per inch version. This means that if you have a nut on a rod like this, and turn the rod 16 times, it will advance that nut one full inch. Converting that to a 1/4" box joint, from the start position, you make one cut, turn the rod 8 times and that will advance the carriage 1/2" inch which means the second cut will leave a 1/4" pin, then make the cut at the 1/2" mark, and so on ... thus making the beginnings of the box joint cuts.

Making A Table Saw Jig for Tapered Legs and More

taper leg jigAnyone who has done any woodworking during their lifetime will know that a lot of woodworking is all about the jigs that can be made. I have seen jigs made for one purpose and one use only and other jigs for multi uses that have been used over and over again for years and years.
The jig we are making today fits in the latter category. A jig with more than one use that will provide years and years of excellent, time saving and accurate usage.

The purpose of the jig is to (1) make tapered legs, as is often seen in a variety of tables and (2) to trim boards that have curved or rough edges so they can be easily jointed or sawn on the table saw ... and who knows what other uses may crop up over time.

Then jig is a simple one and you can make it any sizes you want. I made mine 4' long and 16" wide. The reason for the 16" is that I seldom get boards wider than about 10" and these would easily be accommodated on the jig and it would still allow for a nice balance on my table saw. The material I selected for base was ...

Making a Chainsaw Sharpening JIg

I know that to get good at something you need to practice, but I just never seem to use my Husqvarna Chainsaw enough to really get efficient at sharpening the blade. I do a good job of sharpening, but I know it takes me much longer than someone who uses the saw a lot.
My biggest challenge is when I have the saw in the field, and inadvertently hit the dirt or some small rocks, I can feel the blade getting dull instantly and have to stop to sharpen it. This is where my sharpening skills need the most help. I find it difficult at best to try and hold the saw with one hand and sharpen with the other. I know there are some jigs you can buy that you can drive into the stump of a tree, then clamp the chainsaw bar to ... but I never seem to be around a big enough stump to use one of these clamps. I am however, very often fairly close to my truck, so why not build a clamping system for the chainsaw bar, that I can fasten to my truck's tailgate, that I can then spend a few minutes and make a good job of sharpening the blade.

 

I started off by measuring the size of my saw and cutting an old piece of 1/2" plywood to fit. In my case 31" x 15". Next I needed to make a simple rack that would hole the motor and handles from moving around too much ...

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