Feature Members

Turner Art Liestman

Art Liestman produces incredible wood turning designs:
"My interest in woodworking began during my graduate student years. As an avid music listener and musician, I was inspired to try my hand at making some percussion instruments“ both copies of  ˜real' instruments and some that were experimental."

To read the full article on Art Liestman and see images of his project, click "read more" below for the full article

Art Liestman

I am originally from Shawnee, Kansas. I moved to British Columbia in 1981 after completing my Ph.D. at the University of Illinois to pursue my academic career as a faculty member at Simon Fraser University. I am currently a Professor in the School of Computing Science at SFU which means that my day job involves undergraduate and graduate teaching, research, and administrative tasks. My research is in theoretical computing science, focusing on the interaction between network structure and communication problems.

My interest in woodworking began during my graduate student years. As an avid music listener and musician, I was inspired to try my hand at making some percussion instruments – both copies of ‘real' instruments and some that were experimental. A complication was that I had to do this in the living room of my apartment with very few hand tools. After moving to British Columbia, I continued to explore music and musical instruments and eventually was able to establish a shop in my home.

"Green Wave".
big leaf maple and ebony

Several years later, I joined a local woodworking club (the Pacific Woodworkers Guild) and began to participate in their annual 2x4 contest. The idea of the contest is to make something using only an 8' long 2x4 (of any variety of wood), glue, and finishing products. The constraints of this contest force the participants to think creatively. My entries have generally been musical instruments. One year, I decided to make a programmable automated xylophone. To complete the instrument, I realized that it would be helpful to have some turned parts. After consulting with my brother (who makes bagpipes), I obtained my first lathe and learned just enough about turning to make the parts. The instrument ("Hunka hunka churnin' wood") was a big hit, winning the contest that year and generating a surprising amount of media coverage.


Soon, I did some more turning and eventually began to see myself primarily as a woodturner, rather than a woodworker.

"Cold Snap". It's made of big leaf maple burl and ebony

I learned more about turning, concentrating on bowls and small functional items. I began to consider the possibility of making more artistic work after seeing an inspiring demonstration by Frank Sudol. An Educational Opportunity Grant from the AAW allowed me to study with Jacques Vesery. That was a pivotal experience, beginning the search for my own voice and continuing to affect my work today.

The need for more exposure to woodturners from outside our area was a major motivation for founding the Greater Vancouver Woodturners Guild (an AAW chapter) in 1999. Our club has been highly successful and I have benefited greatly from the exposure to our visiting woodturners.



"Out of the Box" big leaf maple

I am currently exploring various surface enhancements on hollow forms and other turned objects. Most of these enhancements involve subdividing the surface into regions. A major focus is my series of puzzling illusion pieces that appear to be jigsaw puzzles. Another series, inspired by the paintings of Mondrian and Klee, has surfaces broken into regions that are individually colored first with alcohol-based dyes and then sprayed with thinned black acrylic ink. The Sherlock Holmes story "The Adventure of the Dancing Men" provided a substitution code that allows me to encode messages on the surface of my '"dancing men" pieces. A series called "burning fields" features surfaces subdivided into irregular and highly textured regions. A recent development is the "vox" - a box that appears to be a hollow vessel when it is closed.

"I Am Slow But Expensive". It is made of big leaf maple burl

I turn on a Stubby 750 using a variety of tools. For hollowing, I am an advocate of the constrained handle systems. I do all of my hollowing with a Jamieson handle and various cutters including those made by Jamieson and by Kelton. I use many different tools for carving including rotary and reciprocating carvers, high-speed dental type tools, and pyrography tools. For coloring, I use acrylics and various dyes.

You can see more of my work at www.artliestman.com and at various galleries including del Mano (Los Angeles), Northwest Fine Woodworking (Seattle), Crafthouse (Vancouver), Gallery Xylos (Calgary), the Guild Shop (Toronto), and guild.com (cyberspace).

Featured WoodWorkWeb Member - Colin Delory

 "To some people woodturning is more than a hobby, it becomes an extension of their creativity and artistic endeavors. This month our Feature Member is Colin Delory - Woodturner. We know you will be as amazed as we were when you see the kinds of turnings this dedicated and talented artist creates "

To read the full article on Colin Delory and see images of his project, click "read more" below for the full article

Turner Colin Delory

"To some people woodturning is more than a hobby, it becomes an extension of their creativity and artistic endeavors. This month our Feature Member is Colin Delory - Woodturner. We know you will be as amazed as we were when you see the kinds of turnings this dedicated and talented artist creates "

To read the full article on Colin Delory and see images of his project, click "read more" below for the full article

>Colin Delory was born in England then emigrating to Canada as a pre-teen. His formal education took place in Winnipeg, Manitoba a beautiful province with tremendous contrasts in terrain and climate. Colin spent 38 years as a project engineer and engineering manager in the telephone industry in both Manitoba and BC. An exacting career that no doubt helped to formulate his precise accuracy and patience in later years when he took up woodturning.

 

On retiring in 1997, Colin took up woodturning and began turning out some exquisite works. As a lover of wood, he enjoys reclaiming "prunings" of various tree species and other so-called waste woods, which he then turns into bowls, ornaments, urns, and other works of art. Colin has a particular knack for combining woods as one can plainly see from the pictures of his work. He appears to take great delight in combining different colors and textural characteristics in producing his unique turned works.Colin is also and active member of Fraser Valley Woodturners Guild and the Greater Vancouver Woodturners Guild, both clubs boast of having extremely talented turners. He is also a member of the American Association of Woodturners, a move that rounds out his international diversity.

 


For more information on Colin Delory turnings, please visit ...

http://www3.telus.net/delory/

Turner Bill Kandler


"I spent some 29 years almost exclusively using the left side of my head designing computer software. As I approached retirement (we call it being retarded) in 2000, it seemed to be time to exercise the right side a little."


To read the full article on Bill Kandler and see images of his projects, click "read more" below for the full article

I spent some 29 years almost exclusively using the left side of my head designing computer software. As I approached retirement (we call it being retarded) in 2000, it seemed to be time to exercise the right side a little. I thought back upon things I had done that had been fun as a way of figuring out how to occupy my newfound time and previously idle brain parts. Woodworking came to mind as I remembered that I started out my adult life by making all of my own furniture. The work included a couch, chair, footstool, lamp table, lamp, coffee table, three-piece chest-of-drawers set, and two nightstands.

In the process, I learned a lot about how the various shop tools worked and techniques needed, how to make my own veneer, and how not to use it.

The lamp, my only lathe project, stood out as the most fun. So I searched around and bought a lathe. When I got it set up, I started reading the instruction book. It's one of the rare times I've done that sort of thing. When I came to the section on segmented bowls, my interest was aroused. I made a small project and was hooked.

I designed my early projects using a simple CAD program to draw out the rings and bowl profiles. I made beautiful drawings with dimension lines all over the place. My first dozen projects were designed this way. But these drawings were too complex and I made too many mistakes in cutting the segments. I went out looking for software to help me do the design work.

Well, all I found in my search were a couple of ring calculators and that just didn't cut it for me. I wanted a tool that handled the entire project.

Since I developed software throughout my professional career, I launched on a task to create my own tool. It's the good old "Not Invented Here" syndrome. It worked well for me, and I decided to see if it would work well for others. Now I've learned how to sell software on the Internet, helped more than a few newbies get into segmented objects, and have more than 330 users across ten different countries. It's been fun.

As my desires for new designs develop, so develops the program. What started out as a fairly simple tool has matured into a tool where I can develop both simple and rather complex designs with equal ease.

I've just started project 26 and it's beginning to get a little crowded in our living room. A sofa table I designed a couple of years ago is my temporary display case. My wife has started a campaign to get the top of it cleared off so she can display something.

I've started selling some of the pieces and it gives me real satisfaction to see the pieces spark up someone else's table or room and it's a way to deal with my space problems. I recently donated one item for an auction presented by a local charity and was pleasantly surprised by the price it garnered
.
If this is enough to raise your interest, you can find out a whole lot more at my site where I sell my software (of course), display some of my work, and the work of others who use the program. I also offer tips on how to approach segmented objects. The site URL is http://www.segmentedturning.com/.



 

 

 

 

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